3 Winter Wonderlands Worth Visiting in Italy

Italy is one of the most magical places in winter. The south has a beautiful coastline and mild temperatures. The crowds in Rome, Florence, and Venice are very rare (except during Carnevale). It is the ideal time to enjoy relative peace and tranquility at the Sistine Chapel and Uffizi.

However, there are some places in Italy that were built for snow. What happens when winter comes around? They’re simply… wonderful!,

These are our top picks for the three most beautiful winter wonderlands in Italy.

The Dolomites: skiing, snow and Tyrolean flavour

Sunrise over Presanella Glacier – at 11,673 feet, Trentino’s highest peak!

Ask any skier and they will tell you where they would like to go in Italy. It must be special, considering the mountain range faces stiff competition from a country known for its Appenines and Alps.

It is. The Dolomites are breathtaking. They run through Italy’s northeastern provinces of Belluno and South Tyrol. They are made of dolomite rocks and turn pink in the afternoon. This unusual effect is known to Italians as “enrosadira” and enchants flatland-lovers. They also have some of Europe’s finest skiing, including the famous Cortina d’Ampezzo. Third, they have an interesting hybrid culture that is as Austrian-Tyrolean as it is Italian. This makes it almost impossible for The Sound of Music songs not to be played in their heads. One strange side effect of the region’s history is that most locals don’t speak Italian but German. ).

The Dolomites offer a variety of hiking, climbing and snow-shoeing opportunities. You can also enjoy schnapps at a Tyrolean-style pub.

Turin: Activities for all interests in the foothills the Alps


Turin at night in winter: beautiful and lit up

Turin, also known as “Torino” in Italian, is one of Italy’s most cultural cities. It’s the ideal place to spend the winter days in its museums, shops, theaters, and cafes.

Turin has something for everyone. Are you a car lover? Turin is a major centre of the Italian automobile industry. It also houses the Museo dell’Automobile. On display are everything from the Isotta Franchini of Sunset Boulevard to one of the earliest FIATs. Are you a film buff? The Museo Nazionale del Cinema is a great place to go if you are a film fan. It has everything from Marilyn Monroe’s bustier, to Peter O’Toole’s Lawrence of Arabia robe. Do you enjoy art? There are many opportunities to enjoy art, including Impressionist works (Renoir and Manet, Matisse, oh!). Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli, works by Klee & Dix at Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna eContemporanea, and the Old Masters (hello Rembrandt and Tintoretto!) at Galleria Sabauda.

There are also the grand interiors of Turin’s palaces, which was once the official residence for the royal Houses of Savoy. Also, Turin is known as the site of the Holy Shroud and the Teatro Regio, an 18-century opera house that premiered Puccini’s “La boheme”. ).

Valle d’Aosta


The Roman ruins of Aosta are covered in snow

This is a little-known and very little! This beautiful region is located in Italy’s northwest. It is nestled between France, Switzerland, and Piemont. It’s also a magical place in winter.

The area’s most distinctive feature is its mountain culture. These are the two highest peaks of the entire Alps, each at over 15,000 feet. The Valle d’Aosta is the perfect place to find every children’s book illustration of snow-capped mountains rising above idyllic, church-top villages.

The region has more to offer than that. The region is home to many Roman ruins dating back to the time that Emperor Augustus established its capital city, Aosta, more than 2,000 years ago. There are many medieval castles. Not to be forgotten, skiing is the best (here are Cervinia/Zermatt, Courmayeur/Mont Blanc, and other resorts).

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