It’s July in Italy: What you Need to Know

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It has been a constant topic of conversation about July in Italy. It is right at the middle of summer and the peak tourist season. This means high temperatures, high prices and large crowds.

It is worth the expense and crowds to visit Italy in July, despite the fact that it is hot all year. It doesn’t matter when you visit Italy, it is a good idea do some research ahead to learn what to expect.

Here’s everything you need to know about Italy’s weather and holidays if you are planning to travel to Italy in July.

July Weather in Italy

If you search for temperature averages in different regions of Italy, you will find the ranges I have listed below. However, I suspect that those averages may be a bit out-of-date as it has been noticeably warmer in Italy in recent decades. The averages are still a good starting point.

It’s hot in Italy in July, so that’s the bottom line.

The summers in Italy are often hotter than in July, but it is still very hot in July. Not only is humidity high in most of the country, but it’s also hot. Even if you feel like you are used to the heat and humidity at home, remember that you don’t usually engage in the same type of go-go/go schedule when you travel. On hot days at home, you can either relax in your backyard or turn on the AC. It’s a journey from one attraction in Italy to the next.

I recommend that you keep your schedule less crowded in hot weather. This will allow you to take enough time to relax and recharge between sights, if necessary. It should be obvious, but here I am repeating it: please keep hydrated and protect from the sun.

The following are the average temperatures for July in different regions of Italy:

  • Northern Italy: 65-85degF (18-30degC).
  • Central Italy: 65-90degF (18-32degC)
  • Southern Italy: 75-90degF (24-33.2degC).

As always, make sure to check the extended forecast for the place you are actually going before you leave. This will allow you to know in advance if it is unseasonably warm or cold.

Continue reading on my Italy weather page

Italy’s July Holidays and Festivals

It’s not as extensive as you might think. You can find small celebrations and festivals in various towns and cities, but there are no national holidays.

The Palio’s first annual run in Siena takes place in July, while Verona’s Opera Festival is held throughout the summer. You can always look up information on local festivals and other events in the area. Although they may not be well-known but often are great fun, it’s a good idea.

Why go to Italy in July when it is so beautiful?

If you plan to visit Italy in July, you will be spending a lot of time in the sun. This is great if you have beaches in your itinerary. You’ll also have to deal with large crowds (which can be a good thing, if you’re ready for it), and higher prices (which is usually not something you like).

It will be harder to find quiet places away from the crowds in July. However, if you book your museum tickets in advance you can avoid the long lines outside the Vatican Museums and Uffizi Gallery. Although you will pay more for things such as airfare or hotel rooms, it can be cheaper to plan ahead than being stuck with the pricier rooms.

However, summer in Italy can be expensive if you have a tight budget. While you can save money in some cases by skipping the larger tourist destinations, it’s not always possible to do so during peak summer.

Bottom line: If your travel budget isn’t your main limiting factor, and you don’t mind crowds, July in Italy might be a good option. To avoid long lines and to save money, book early and make sure you have enough time to relax and hydrate throughout the day. It is a good idea to take it slow and make your July trip to Italy memorable.

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